How to do Adaptive Management in 15 easy steps – from a top new toolkit

This is the second part of a review of a new paper written by Graham Teskey and Lavinia Tyrrel. Find the first post on the Soapbox here. The review was written by Oxfam's Duncan Green and featured on the From Poverty to Power blog. Yesterday I summarized the thinking behind an important new toolkit on adaptive management. …

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Review of ‘Implementing adaptive management: A front-line effort. Is there an emerging practice?’

Oxfam's Duncan Green (From Poverty to Power) reviews Graham Teskey and Lavinia Tyrrel's new paper. In recent years, I’ve been one of a crowd of people thinking and pontificating about ‘adaptive management’. The debate has been rather dominated by academics and thinktankers, fond of hand-waving generalizations and rather better at taking down the bad stuff …

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Accountability is the path to better governance in PNG

by Justice Gua When we look at progress in decentralisation in Papua New Guinea over the last 20 years – the sole continuous and overriding policy priority of successive governments – many challenges remain to improve downstream service delivery. Programming for “social accountability” shifts the focus from governmentto governance. It’s about the difficult stuff, even it’s …

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From anger to action: three things Australia must do at home to continue being a gender champion abroad

by Leisa Gibson and Lavinia Tyrrel Content warning: This post discusses sexual assault Anger. Frustration. Despondency. Trauma. Solidarity. These are the emotions we, and many other women like us, have felt in Australia this past fortnight. Recent events in Canberra have once again brought to light stories of violence, harassment and discrimination against women and …

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Adaptive gardening

by Graham Teskey Author's garden I spent much of the weekend gardening. Or more specifically I spent much of the weekend providing labour to the horticulture adviser in my household, a.k.a. my wife. Last month we had the garden ‘landscaped’ by professionals, a deal which included the delivery of 65 small trees, shrubs, and other …

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Reflections from an Ex-Vice President: The political / civil service divide

Image credit: Shutterstock; Illustration by POGO The relationship between public servants and ministers is critical to sound, ‘evidence-based’ policy making. Ideally, in a Weberian public service, officials feel empowered to speak truth to power, and offer free and frank advice without fear of bullying or other adverse reprisals. Sadly, as we have seen in both …

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PEA Update 6: common criticisms of PEA approaches, and MEL tools for mitigating them

This blog forms part of a series of internal Political Economy Analysis (PEA) updates compiled by Priya Chattier/Tara Davda, with general wisdom by Graham Teskey and Lavinia Tyrrel. Thanks to Leisa Gibson/Priya for GESI support. We will aim to publish these every fortnight or so. Watch this space. This week focuses on criticisms of the …

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The puzzle of equitable senior leadership in global development and how your skills can get you there

By : Jacqui De Lacy, Anna Winoto, Esther McIntosh, Lena Kolyada, Priya Chattier, and Leisa Gibson Many of us have worked hard to address racial and gender inequality so that women are simply recognised for their skills and talent. Recently, we discussed this at the 2020 Women in Global Development Leadership Forum. It is no …

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PEA Update 5: Putting TWP, PDIA, DDD and AM into Practice (or, more colloquially, what these tongue twister terms mean and why they matter)

This blog forms part of a series of internal Political Economy Analysis (PEA) updates compiled by Priya Chattier/Tara Davda, with general wisdom by Graham Teskey and Lavinia Tyrrel. Thanks to Leisa Gibson (and Priya) for GESI support. We will aim to publish these every fortnight or so. Watch this space. This week provides more detail …

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Gender trouble with ‘thinking and working politically’

By Priya Chattier and Leisa Gibson Foreword to the blog: This blog is part of a gender responsive Political Economy Analysis series that aims to bring ‘gender’ back into the political economy discourse. In particular, the need to problematise gender as an analytical category of power analysis that aims to advance the political economy and …

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Podcast: Are managing contractors the problem, or the solution?

Interview with Jacqui De Lacey Facilities are often misunderstood by the development community and have been subject to a number of criticisms, including high transaction costs, excessive complexity and for adding an necessary layer of administration between DFAT and the delivery of aid and development funding. In this podcast (recorded with Rachel Mason Nunn for …

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